Herbal Folklore


Check this post out- it is very interesting. I love the colorful history that herbs have and I also love that science it starting to prove that some old wives tales are true.

Originally posted on Sanctuary Gardener:

Fantasy forest house via 1ms.net SG

Tuesday evening, I attended my first meeting of the South Carolina Herbal Society here in Charleston. Because I’m very interested in learning about herbs and herbal medicine, I brought my membership form and annual fee with me. After the first meeting, I can already say that it is going to be worth it! The leader of the meeting is an experienced herbalist, and she shared for an hour and a half on herbal folklore. As we know, there is usually a thread of truth underlying “old wives’ tales” or folklore, so it was interesting to learn how people used herbs centuries ago. Although she couldn’t possibly touch on every herb and its folklore in that short period of time, she did speak about the most common herbs. I’d like to now share with you some of what I learned.

I took pages and pages of notes during the meeting, writing furiously to…

View original 1,491 more words

There May Be Snow, But The Seasons Have Changed: A Different Kind Of Snow Day With A Hot Chocolate Recipe

Jonathan in the ice

I love snow days, I always have.  Once we began the farm, snow days were certainly different from the snow days where we just got to bundle up and watch movies.  Making sure the animals have water, shelter, and extra feed can take away from the pleasure at times, but it also brings its own kind of pleasure.

At this stage, the number of our animals is greatly reduced  and Jonathan, who loves snow and ice and cold, was happy to carry out the duties awaiting him.  Sierra and I got to stay indoors and relax.

BUT here is the thing that made this snow day different- my oldest two were not at home, they were at their homes.  In the past, even though they had moved out, they still came home- to my home- on snow days and got iced in with us.  This time they did not.

Savannah called midday and I said to Sierra, “I bet she is calling to see if her daddy thinks she can drive on the roads and come home.”  Well, she was calling to see if he thought it safe to drive but she was wanting to go to Dakota not here.  Home for now means being wherever Dakota is, home for her is now more about a person than a place.  And that is good, given that their wedding is now just a few months away.

As for Cheyenne a day at home with no college or work meant a day at her home.  She now lives with my grandmother, her great-grandmother.  I know that home very well as I have spent many days there with two of my most beloved women.  I know that she spent plenty of time standing in front of the Deerborn heater warming her backside then turning around to warm the front.  Central heat is nice but there is something about having a warm spot to back up to on a cold day.  She was content in a warm house full of love- her home.

This is the first year that I have seen a distinct separation from my home to their own homes even though they moved away two years ago.  I thought it would be more upsetting but its not.  It is in its due time.  There are seasons in our life, not just spring and winter, but seasons for certain types of living.  My season for having all of my babies at home has passed.  I love having time to focus with the younger two and I love having teenagers.  Most people find me crazy, but I love it.  Its a new season, but a good one.  Each season has its place.  The mistake most mothers make is to try and hold on to one season for too long.  This simply causes strife and conflict and it will not stop the season from changing.  The seasons will change with or without our permission, best to embrace the change and enjoy every moment for what it is.

So, today we will enjoy another day at home with just the younger two and make some more memories and drink hot chocolate!  I have my own hot chocolate recipe I developed and we  just love it.

Here it is so you can make homemade hot chocolate that tastes way better than anything from a package.

Hot Chocolate

2 Cups whole milk

3 cups heavy cream

3 tablespoons of Cocoa

1/4 cup sugar

2 teaspoons of vanilla

Mix together and heat through in a heavy bottomed sauce pan.  Top with marshmallows if you desire (which we do).

The sugar could be substituted with organic raw sugar, honey, or agave nectar if you are looking for an unprocessed version.

Lettuce Get Planting! How To Grow Lettuce In Texas

Lettuce, Herbs, Green Onions, and Radishes- great fall crops

This post in from the archives- and oldie but a goodie!

There are some nasty rumors going around about lettuce.  I hear that it is really hard to grow with lots of insect problems.  It has also been said that lettuce grown in Texas tastes bitter because of the heat.  Lies, all of them.

The misinformation comes from the fact that  the instructions on the back of seed packets and those great little farming magazines are written for folks living in the areas of the country that actually have four seasons and one growing season.  Now do not misunderstand me, I love my gardening magazines, but the time lines do not line up. Well, welcome to Texas Gardening.  There is a rhythm to gardening in Texas that is as unique as our Texas spirit.  Once you learn the rhythm you will be amazed at what you can grow.

However, for now we will focus on lettuce and its cousins.  It perturbs me to no end to have to purchase greens of any kind in the grocery store.  Homegrown greens are so easy and tasty!  Also, it is so much easier to have a bed of lettuce and just go pick you some whenever you want, than to have to go to the store when you want a salad.  If you are like me, lots of times what’s for dinner is not something planned very far in advance.  So, having items growing in the garden to have on hand is just the ticket.

One of the perks about lettuce and all the other greens, such as arugula, chard, spinach, etc. is that they can by eaten at all stages.  Baby greens make for a scrumptious salad or sandwich.  Many people, like my children, do not like mature spinach but love baby spinach.  So, while the plants are growing you can pick the outer leaves and enjoy the garden abundance for many weeks.  The greens( the term greens refers to all types of lettuce, herbs, kale, greens, spinach etc)  do not take a lot of space.  One 5X12  foot bed of greens will keep my family of 6 in fresh greens.

Now to dispel the lies.

First, that lettuce is hard to grow.  Not so, you just have to know when to plant it.  If you read many of the labels on lettuce sold in Texas, the labels  say to plant after all danger of frost has passed.  The problem with this is that if you wait that long in Texas you can have as little as 2 weeks until the temps are consistently in the mid- 80′s.  The proper planting times in Texas are February- April and September- December.  Lettuce is a cool season crop.  When most areas of the country are having dead of winter, we are having our cool season.   When we have had a mild winter, I harvest greens from September until June.  That is only 2 months of store-bought greens in a year.  That makes my heart happy! Most lettuce varieties,as well as spinach and collard greens, can stand temperatures down to 23′ degrees.  Some winters we don’t even get that cold once so you can have a productive garden all winter.

Second lie- lettuce has many insect problems. Now there are certain worms- Cabbage Loppers for example- that do like lettuce.  However, these are easily dispatched with Bt.  Bt- (Bacillus thuringiensis) is a naturally occurring bacterial disease that only attacks caterpillars.  Bt is organic and you can eat the produce with no worries that synthetic pesticides bring.  There are other insects that can be a problem at times, but I have found in my gardens that Bt is all I need to keep things in balance.  Also, there are other methods of insect control, but again the Bt is simple, easy and effective so that is what I use.  You can find it at most hardware and garden supply stores.  If you have fertile soil fed and amended with organic compost and fertilizers, most other insects won’t pose a large problem.

Third Lie- lettuce grown in Texas tastes bitter- hogwash.  Again, you just need to know when to plant and what varieties to plant.  The types that are considered “slow to bolt” are the best for planting in the spring.  Bolting refers to sending up a conical shaft with blooms that will produce seeds.  Warm weather signifies to the lettuce that it is time to make seeds.  So, those lettuces that are slow to bolt will be the most tolerant of warm weather.  While you are looking in seed catalogs for heirloom selections (heirloom refers to varieties that will reproduce consistently if the seeds are saved) look for ones that were developed in Louisiana, Arkansas, Texas- of course- or Israel.  These areas have climates similar to ours and those varieties will usually do well here for the spring planting.  Look for varieties labeled “Cool season” or “cold tolerant” on the lettuces, these will be the ones for planting in the fall.  When it comes to the spinach, swiss chard, and kale- these are not even stopped by a freeze so they will grow all winter.

lettuce in compost raised beds

Some of my favorite varieties are:
For Fall Planting: Black Seeded Simpson, Drunken Woman, Tom Thumb, Oakleaf
For Spring Planting:  Oakleaf, Jericho- awesome, Tom Thumb
Spinach- Longstanding Bloomsdale is great year round.

Most of your annual herbs like dill, Salad Burnett, chives are best planted on the same schedule as lettuce.
I like to sow the seeds in wide beds.  I thin the seedlings and use them in salads as baby greens.  Keep the lettuce or greens watered one inch once per week and a little shade is very helpful for extending the growing season in the summer.  The seeds usually germinate and emerge in 7-10 days.

So there you have it- the truth about lettuce.  Now what are you waiting for?  September is coming to a close and October is upon us,  I can just taste the homegrown lettuce now.

Raised beds are great for gardening, this one in the front is filled with baby greens.

Think Southern Florida Is Just For Old Folks? Think Again…

While continuing on the Road Less Traveled we traveled south from Ft. Pierce a few miles and explored Bathtub Reef.  Located at the south end of Hutchison Island, Bathtub Reef Park is a must for snorkeling.  Tubeworms have built a reef by cementing bits of sand and shell creating reef rocks that look like honeycomb.  The reef creates a shallow swim area with very mild waves.  Which makes for a great day of just wading and looking at all the see life.  We picked up shells with our toes and took turns snorkeling out to the reef.  If it weren’t for the amazing sea life that we watched such as sea urchins, clown fish, and brightly colored coral, this would have just been a lazy day at the beach.  But the underwater world we got to be a part of made this no ordinary day at the beach.

Bathtub Reef Park, Florida



We were told to go early as the parking lot fills up quick- so we did.  We arrived about 8:30 and had the whole place to ourselves.

What happened next might have scared off the faint of heart- we watched a group of sharks feeding.

Here’s the thing- sharks don’t like to eat people they like bait fish.  Bait fish swim in schools that do not stay in one place for long.  We simply waited till the schools had moved on till we played in the sea.

Two sissy-boy fishermen walked past and were all freaked out telling us that we were crazy to swim there that day.  Whatever- any real fishermen would know that there are sharks in the ocean each and every day.  We had a blast and returned to our condo with all of our limbs and digits intact.


picnic at Bathtub Reef Park, Florida

We took along our lunch as this area is not jammed up with tourists and restaurants.  Dinning Alfresco is more fun, anyway.  Another thing this beach did not have much of was sea gulls- we have tried many times to picnic on the beach only to have to hide in the Excursion until we were done as the gulls would dive bomb our sandwiches.  But once again we thought it would be a good idea- I can’t explain why we kept thinking it would work but I guess it’s just that hope springs eternal in the human heart.  And this time it did work!  And it was just as great as we thought it would be.

Sierra Reading at the beach

Napping on the beach

Of course, after you eat you should definitely take a nap.

Bathtub Reef Florida

birds Bathtub Reef Park

There may not have been gulls, but there were lots of these birds.  They enjoyed the bread we tossed to them but were very polite and never approached us much less bullied us like the sea gulls would have.

We really enjoyed ourselves.  Dakota, Savannah, and Jonathan returned to the reef before we came home.  The snorkeled for hours and Jonathan got to break in his new gear that he bought with his spending money.

Surrounding the beach are some very nice homes, we were all discussing what it would be like to live in one and see this sight everyday- would it get old?  I doubt it , beauty is timeless.  I do think I would certainly be inspired to write a novel.  I just don’t see how you could resist.

This is a free park and it is so nice.  I can’t say enough about the fun we had and the unique little gem of a reef sitting just yards off the beach.  If you are looking for a great place for families this it one.

The One Thing The Food Industry Won’t Tell You

Slate’ Criticizes the ‘Home-Cooked Family Dinner’: Joel Salatin Responds

Tags: Joel Salatin, family dinner, home cooking, Slate

Victimhood escalates to stratospheric whining with Amanda Marcotte’s recent Slate post titled Let’s Stop Idealizing the Home-Cooked Family Dinner.

Joel SalatinThe piece concluded more often than not family members (especially the male ones) were ingrates and, generally, home-cooked meals were too stressful, expensive, time-consuming, and utensil-dependent to be worthy of the trouble.

Marcotte’s indictment of what she considers a romanticized cultural icon certainly speaks volumes about where our cultural mainstream food values reside. Indeed, the average American is probably far more interested and knowledgeable about the latest belly-button piercing in Hollywood celebrity culture than what will become flesh of their flesh and bone of their bone at 6 p.m.

In the circles I run in and market to, the home-cooked meal is revered as the ultimate expression of food integrity. The home-cooked meal indicates a reverence for our bodies’ fuel, a respect for biology, and a committed remedial spirit toward all the shenanigans in our industrial, pathogen-laden, nutrient-deficient food-and-farming system.

I would imagine most of the ungrateful males in these families watch TV or see a lot of food ads on their computers. You won’t find integrity food advertised on TV or pop-culture web sites. It’ll be a steady brainwash of junk food, convenience, highly processed food-like materials. That we can physically chew and swallow the stuff does not make it desirable for our bodies.

Further, since when are women the only ones who are supposed to shoulder the burden for integrity food? Why doesn’t Marcotte, rather than whining about unappreciated women, write instead about families who seem to think sports leagues and biggest-screen TVs are more important than health? Who think pharmaceutical companies are responsible for wellness?  Who think no difference exists between factory chickens and pastured chickens?

Here’s the question I would like to ask these families: “Are you spending time or money on anything unnecessary?” Cigarettes, alcohol, coffee, soft drinks, lottery tickets, People Magazine, TV, cell phone, soccer games, potato chips . . . ?  Show me the household devoid of any of these luxuries, then let’s talk. Otherwise, you’re just unwilling to do what’s more important, which is provide for the health of your family and your environment. That’s a personal choice, and one that’s entirely within your control.

I’m amazed at the difficult situations I hear about in which people do indeed rise to the occasion. Whether it’s sprouting mung beans or alfalfa seeds in a quart jar on the windowsill or buying grain by the bushel, resourceful, can-do people committed to changing their situation figure out a way to do it.

For Marcotte to accept irresponsibility this easily underscores a profound courage deficiency. Turn off the TV, get out of the car, get off the phone and get in the kitchen — men, women and children. The most expensive potatoes in the nation are cheaper by the pound than the cheapest potato chips. Ditto healthful ground beef from pastured cattle versus fast-food burgers.  

With slow cookers, indoor plumbing, timed-bake and refrigerators, today’s techno-enabled kitchens allow busy people to cook from scratch and eat with integrity far easier than during Great Grandma’s time. She had to fetch water from the spring, split stove wood, start a fire and churn the butter and she still managed to feed a large family very well. If our generation can’t do at least as well with our 40-hour work week and kitchen tech, then we deserve to eat adulterated pseudo food that sends us to an early grave. I don’t know that anyone’s children deserve this, however.

While extreme hardship does certainly exist — and my heart breaks for impoverished people who truly have no resources — let’s not excuse the other 98 percent from their responsibility on that account. If everyone who could do something would do it, perhaps we would all have enough left over to help the egregious hardship cases. Soccer moms driving their kiddos half a day one way to a tournament, stopping at the drive-by for “chicken” nuggets, and then dismissing the kitchen as “too stressful” is an upside-down value system. And how many of the men whining about not liking what they’re being fed spend their Saturdays on the riding mower managing a monoculture, fertilized ecological-dead-zone of a suburban lawn, rather than using their resources to grow something nutritious for their families and wholesome for the planet? When do we start talking about them? Hmmmmm?

Photo by Richard Lord: Joel Salatin raises pastured poultry and grass-fed beef at Polyface Farms in Swoope, Va.

Read more: http://www.motherearthnews.com/real-food/slate-family-dinner-zb0z1409zsie.aspx#ixzz3Ckxhk96M

The Road Less Traveled- Round Island, Florida

Round island, two paths, florida

The Road Not Taken


Two roads diverged in a yellow wood,
And sorry I could not travel both
And be one traveler, long I stood
And looked down one as far as I could
To where it bent in the undergrowth;
Then took the other, as just as fair,
And having perhaps the better claim,
Because it was grassy and wanted wear;
Though as for that the passing there
Had worn them really about the same,
And both that morning equally lay
In leaves no step had trodden black.
Oh, I kept the first for another day!
Yet knowing how way leads on to way,
I doubted if I should ever come back.
I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.
When you take the road less traveled in Florida, it will lead you away from the condos, tourist packed beaches, resorts, and retirement villages and what you find at the end if that road is breath-taking, simple, and beautiful.  We made many stops on this journey- the first to be shared is Round Island Florida- located just North of Fort Pierce, Florida.
sisters on round island Florida
looking for manatees
Looking for manatees- Round Island.  What a great find this place was, how grateful we are to the new friends we made in Florida that told us where to go!  This is the Indian River, a place where the manatees like to hang-out.
kayaking on Indian River
Cheyenne and I are in the kayak and you can see the manatee swimming up to us.  He was so very friendly and kept coming to check us out.  Tony took the pictures from the bridge that connected the shore line to the island.  This was a great view for watching the manatees.
Indian River Florida
You can paddle all around these little islands in the Indian River.  Cheyenne and I saw several manatees and on around the backside of these islands we watched a group of dolphins hunting for fish.  One thing we did not see was an alligator and for that I am grateful!  These islands are filled with mangrove trees, these trees have roots that grow down from branches to the water.  These masses of roots make for excellent nurseries for the marine life.  Jonathan and I paddled around before Cheyenne got in the kayak.  Every time I got close to the trees, he kept getting anxious.  I asked him if he was concerned about a snake dropping out of the tree into out boat, he said, “No, I am afraid you are gonna pop our kayak.”  You see, these were inflatable kayaks loaned to us by our new friends.  Given how durable these things are he needn’t have worried about popping the boat.  I, on the other hand, was quite concerned about the snake issue.  Not that we ever saw a snake at all, but given my irrational reaction to snakes I would have rather met an alligator.
round island
For those not interested in the water, there are wonderful trails, bird watching platforms, and views all around the island.  Also, across the highway on the ocean side, Round Island has a great beach.  The waves are great, the water beautiful and the sands are almost white- but there are no real crowds.
The Crew, Round Island Florida
Another view of the overlook bridge and my wonderful family- this will forever be my greatest accomplishment in this life.

Mastering The Art Of Herb Gardening


Mastering The Art Of Herb Gardening-

Any sort of gardening is an art, one that takes time and experience to master- it is certainly a journey.  Heather Rinaldi, founder of the Texas Worm Ranch, and I are teaming up to offer you a great beginning to your journey of herb gardening.  In our class you will gain knowledge and confidence from the hands on projects and informative lectures.  A workbook is included to help you keep your notes and ideas in one place and to give you a reference for when you are in your own garden and have a question.

Once this class is completed you will have a working knowledge of soil biology- an overview of how plants feed from the soil and how to keep your soil healthy, a working knowledge of how herbs work in the body, how to grow, harvest, and preserve herbs, and how to propagate plants from seed, cuttings, and root division.  All the tools you need to be successful in the herb garden- or vegetable or flower garden as well.  The skills you gain will not only enable you to grow herbs, but they will carry over into the vegetable and flower garden as well.

For both of us, our first memories are in the gardens eating fresh produce right from the fields.  We have both been seriously gardening for more than 10 years and are eager to share our hard earned experience with you.

Each attendee will leave with five herb plants propagated by them, a workbook &  3 seed packets, 10 lbs of premium worm castings and one gallon of Worm Wine ™ to improve soil health. – plus a wealth of knowledge!  It takes a lifetime to master gardening, but with out class you will be on your way to having gardens that are the envy of the town.


The Texas Worm Ranch is located in Garland, TX and this is where the class will take place.


Hollyberry Herb Farm & Texas Worm Ranch present:

Mastering The Art Of Herb Gardening

Tuesday Classes for 3 weeks: 8:30-12:00
July 29,2014-
Herb Overview, Growing, Harvesting & Preserving
August 5, 2014
Soil Biology Made Easy So You Can Garden Easy
August 12,2014
Propagation 3 different ways- Hands On Workshop

Cost is $175.00/person

Class includes:  Workbook, 5 herb plants and 3 seed packets, 10 lbs of premium worm castings and one gallon of Worm Wine ™ to improve soil health.

Sign up at Texas Worm Ranch– class is limited to 20

Hollyberry Herb Farm

Organic Herbs & So Much More!

Sheepy Hollow Farm

Home to Wooly Tyme Shetlands & Kids Play Dairy Goats

Sanctuary Gardener

A Yankee grows in the South ~ Homesteading, gardening, & harvest recipes

Elberta's Place

Farm House & Barn Restoration, Gardening, Animals, Cooking, and DIY Projects

The Iris and the Lily

GAIA'S HEARTBEAT experience the pulsing earth in photos

The Domestic Man

Paleo-friendly recipes inspired by traditional & international cuisines. New recipes every Tuesday.


Pictures of toes, pictures of feet, making the world a better place, one foot at a time.

Girl in a Food Frenzy

Make it, Snap it, Eat it!

down to earth digs

life in and around the garden

Recession Gardening

Home Food Production & Garden Consulting in North Alabama

The Curious Rambler

Margo Lestz, bringing history to life

Belle Grove Plantation Bed and Breakfast

Birthplace of James Madison and Southern Plantation

Dinner of Herbs

Love for healthier foods.

Mark Coakley

Author of "Hidden Harvest" and "Tip and Trade"


The Inspector Clouseau of Blogging.

Transplanted To The South

Culture Shock for a Minnesotan in Louisiana

The Life and Times of Bayoucreole

I'm in love with a city and her name is NOLA


Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 459 other followers

%d bloggers like this: